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Earning a College Degree Doesn't Guarantee More Money


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    I've seen quite a bit of data that states college graduates earn significantly more than someone with just a high school diploma. Though some of the statistics seem to be all over the place with quite a big gap between exactly how much they mean by "significantly more". I also don't think they're looking at all the aspects either.

    Some state that, on average, those with at least a bachelors degree earn around $32,000 more than those who only posses a high school diploma, while others claim the number is around a $20,000 difference. Either way, the numbers they seem to be referring to is the average annual earnings of $78,000 for a college graduate (not taking what type of degree into consideration), and the average annual earnings of $45,000 for a high school graduate.

    Although it's hard to argue with numbers, I'd have to say I disagree with the assessment that a bachelors degree is the ticket to earning much more money. I know plenty of people who never went on to higher-education in the form a associates/bachelors, though they became very successful and picked up what they needed to know along the way. Another route the average numbers aren't taking into consideration is trade school certificates. The U.S. in particular right now is desperate for trade workers, most of which make exceptional money. They don't need someone who has an associates in business, they need someone who went through a few months or a year of that particular trade's education. Along with that, you don't even need a trade certificate in some cases where an apprenticeship is accepted. These people go on to work a lifetime in a good paying career without an education above a high school diploma.

    I just don't agree with the thought that a bachelors degree should be so pushed on kids these days. Everyone knows what the college system has become and it seems to be hurting people in ways that are almost not justifiable in any way now.

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    You certainly don't need a BA to make good money, live comfortably or even become rich and wealthy if that's your thing. It can definitely help broaden your options though, as many employers use a BA as a pre-requisite now. And then there's all the jobs where a degree or certification is a requirement, like for teaching, law, medicine, most scientific pursuits, etc.

    I went through enough college to learn it wasn't for me, at least at the time. I never graduated with a degree, just a bunch of student loan debt. I came to the conclusion that unless I knew I wanted to pursue a job that required a degree, college was simply too expensive just to go through the motions and earn a piece of paper.

    Many employers, even for well paying tech jobs, don't require you to have a BA right now. They value experience and the interview process over what school you graduated from. And least we not forget the most important reason in the world that gets most people hired -- NETWORKING. Who you know and what you can prove you can do is almost always better than what school you can prove you graduated from with whatever degree, unless of course its a requirement like I already stated.

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    TheBiggerBoat Wrote:

    The U.S. in particular right now is desperate for trade workers, most of which make exceptional money. They don't need someone who has an associates in business, they need someone who went through a few months or a year of that particular trade's education. Along with that, you don't even need a trade certificate in some cases where an apprenticeship is accepted. These people go on to work a lifetime in a good paying career without an education above a high school diploma.

    That's a very good point, and very correct. Careers in manual trades can pay very well, especially in welding, plumbing and electricity. We also should take into consideration how much the average college graduate owes in loans, and take that out of their yearly income. I'm sure the numbers would drop significantly after that.